The Marriage Game

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You never stand firm, waiting for the other to back down. You would never, in a million years, treat your spouse like an opponent in an elaborate game of chess in which the winner gets to lie on the couch and watch Mad Men while the loser puts the kids to bed. So why not learn to play the game like a pro? Here are a few things game theory and marriage have in common:.

Advanced marriage guide

To cooperate or not to cooperate? To budge or stand your ground? These are questions married people find themselves asking with surprising frequency. Ideally, the answer is always cooperate, budge, and say OK.

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Note those three magic words: best results possible. The outcome depends on the choices that both of them make With that in mind, here are three strategies game theory offers for improving the outcomes of potential conflicts with your spouse:. Think ahead. And how should that reaction influence my behavior right now? Learn from the past.

How did she react the last time I did this? How can I do things differently now to avoid the same outcome? Put yourself in his shoes. Reading this book is like being on a never-ending carousel ride — the scenery never changes and it becomes tiresome.

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She comes off as unstable, shallow, prone to histrionics, manipulative, and even occasionally, malicious. We will never know why This Queen never married,and there' Reading this book is like being on a never-ending carousel ride — the scenery never changes and it becomes tiresome. We will never know why This Queen never married,and there's probably a few reasons. Her Mothers death? To many executions? Only twenty-five and newly crowned, Elizabeth vows to rule the country as both queen and king. View all 17 comments. Feb 01, Debbi rated it did not like it.


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I was really disappointed in this book. Alison Weir is a respected novelist and writer of historical fiction. Her books are usually well researched and well done. This makes The Marriage Game that much more disappointing. The Marriage Game is the story of Elizabeth I beginning with her assuming the throne. Unfortunately, Alison Weir chose to focus on the most salacious rumors rather than creating a compelling story of one of the most powerful women in history. Weir's Elizabeth is a spoiled, capr I was really disappointed in this book.

Weir's Elizabeth is a spoiled, capricious brat more interested in making out with Robert Dudley than ruling England. The first third of the book is scene after scene of her pouting, flirting, and doing just about everything short of actually having sex. I've read many books by Alison Weir, and this one is just terrible. I was so annoyed by it that I gave up on it before finishing it.

This veteran writer of British historical fiction with pinpoint accuracy focused on Queen Elizabeth I's dithering about marriage over pages, and managed to keep it interesting. Tudor history is one of my passions, but I have never been lured in by the story of Queen Elizabeth I. However, for the first time in my decades old romance with Tudor history, I am inspired to watch movies and read more about "Queen Bess" after the excellent manner in which Alison Weir brought this iconic Queen to li This veteran writer of British historical fiction with pinpoint accuracy focused on Queen Elizabeth I's dithering about marriage over pages, and managed to keep it interesting.

However, for the first time in my decades old romance with Tudor history, I am inspired to watch movies and read more about "Queen Bess" after the excellent manner in which Alison Weir brought this iconic Queen to life. Elizabeth R's voice crackled with life off the pages with Weir's command and authenticity of dialogue. This book spans the period of Elizabeth's ascension to Queen following her coronation up until her death. Apr 09, Katie rated it it was ok Shelves: adult.

The Marriage Game Series in Order - Ella Quinn - FictionDB

In fact, I read the aforementioned book at least a dozen times over the course of a couple years. Sadly, I will not be able to say the same for The Marriage Game. Overall, I found the book to be entirely too long, repetitive, and a rather shallow depiction of a Queen that has been purported to be intelligent, wise, and a good care-taker of her people and kingdom. I understood by the title, The Marriage Game, that this book would mostly focus on how bull-headed Queen Elizabeth I was about marriage, and how she managed to avoid it at all costs, despite the many dangers of leaving England without an heir.

I knew there would be drama and romance, especially where Lord Robert Dudley was involved, but I was also expecting more of an in-depth look into the Queen's frame of mind in the matters of the religious upheaval that occurred during her sister's reign, the politics of the era, and the advances made in education, the arts, and medicine. Instead, I became intimately familiar with Elizabeth's childish temperament, loose ways with countless men, cowardice in dealing with serious issues, and frustrating emotional outbursts on almost every.

Her love affair with Robert Dudley was intriguing at first, but Elizabeth's ceaseless cat-and-mouse game eventually wore my patience thin. Sure, Robert advanced very far and had all the comforts life could offer because of his devotion to and love for the Queen, but he never had a moment's rest or peace for all the emotional upheaval she brought into his life.

Elizabeth's pettiness, jealousy, and impertinence was such that she refused to allow Robert the true happiness he could have found in his eventual marriage to Lettice Essex, nor did she allow him the freedom to experience the full joy of fatherhood. She was verbally, and sometimes physically, abusive to her counselors and courtiers, even when many of them had proved their loyalty ten times over.

She was excessively vain and vindictive, and quite frankly, a poor leader.

Any decision she eventually made came only after great effort on the part of her lords and counselors, and after a ridiculous amount of waffling, tears, and hysterics on her part. Can you tell I'm annoyed? I have a headache just writing this review. There were some interesting bits, such as Elizabeth's infamous run-ins with Mary, Queen of Scotts and her skirmishes with the Spanish Armada, but overall, this book is glaringly lacking in one important aspect: plot.

While I am more of a character-focused reader, all Alison Weir accomplished in her portrayal of Queen Elizabeth I, is painting her in a very unfavorable light, which makes it hard for the reader to sympathize. This is unfortunate because when you think about Elizabeth's tumultuous early years, and how truly terrifying it must have been to be woman on the throne, there should have been a lot with which to sympathize, but Alison Weir simply did not make this a priority.

And that's fine. As an author, she chose to focus, very decidedly, on Queen Elizabeth's staunch avoidance of marriage and subsequent flirtations, and left out most of the other historical aspects of her reign. If you approach this book in the right frame of mind, you may very well enjoy it, as others did.


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It's too shallow for my tastes, thus the two-star rating. Feb 23, Brittany rated it liked it. Thank you to NetGalley and the publishers of this book for providing me with a copy for my unbiased review.


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I have read Alison Weir's historical fiction in the past--namely, The Lady Elizabeth , that until the author's note told me I had no clue was intended as a prequel to this novel rather than a standalone book. Basically, the title says almost all there is to say about the bulk of this book-Queen Elizabeth, playing her "Marriage Game" to keep all the men of the nations around her vying for her hand, wh Thank you to NetGalley and the publishers of this book for providing me with a copy for my unbiased review.

Basically, the title says almost all there is to say about the bulk of this book-Queen Elizabeth, playing her "Marriage Game" to keep all the men of the nations around her vying for her hand, while all the while stringing along several domestic suitors as well, none for longer and more cruelly than Robert Dudley. Oddly, I started out rooting for the romance, like I think I was supposed to? I do not think it was the author's intent to make Elizabeth a wholly frustrating, unsympathetic person--especially in her descriptions near the end of the novel, and regarding execution, we are supposed to see her as good-hearted, if not gripped by fear due to what happened to her own mother; but in the end Elizabeth comes off as manipulative, childish and vain--which was somewhat refreshing if thought about from the standpoint that every other book about her can't seem to stop singing her praises--but I found that I would have much rather Weir spent more time on the parallel she had sketched out in Elizabeth's mind between herself and the Queen of Scots.

I am no historian, so I am not sure if the real Elizabeth I was known for giving everyone in her court nicknames--but even if she was, I tired of that, too. I was almost glad when a few people were spared of nicknames, because they just came across as ridiculous once she started giving them to absolutely everyone and using them constantly. While all in all a decent read, I did have some formatting gripes in that the chapters are far too long--and difficult to pick up mid-chapter. I read on commutes, generally, so I rarely had hours at a time to read through huge chunks of the book.

To have and to hold: pawns in the medieval marriage game

So, commuters and minute-a-day readers might find this one hard to get through for that reason alone, as it is extremely difficult to get 'into' this book in short stretches. I didn't love it, didn't hate it Not enough to keep me from reading Alison Weir again, but also not enough for me to immediately search to see if she has another book out.

Spouses Who Are Totally Killing The Marriage Game

Feb 03, Matt rated it really liked it Shelves: audiobook. Queen Mary is dead! Long live Queen Elizabeth! So begins the latest Weir novel, in which the reader is carried through the life of the final Tudor monarch and her strong-willed beliefs. Labelled the "Virgin Queen", Elizabeth held firm to her beliefs that she need not marry, which all but kept her from producing an heir. Weir examines Elizabeth's sentiments on the matter, while juxtaposing the worst-kept secret in Elizabeth's life; her longtime, scandalous royal love affair with Lord Robert Dudle Queen Mary is dead!

Weir examines Elizabeth's sentiments on the matter, while juxtaposing the worst-kept secret in Elizabeth's life; her longtime, scandalous royal love affair with Lord Robert Dudley. While Elizabeth happily runs the country as both queen and king, her closest advisors attempt to find a suitor to create needed political alliances and bring forth a child. Elizabeth continues a sordid affair with Dudley, crossing all thresholds save that of intercourse, with a devastating fear of pregnancy and its associated pains. While Dudley pledges his heart to her, even while still married, their relationship never takes the step that he wants and Elizabeth fears most, marriage.